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Guide For Law Review Members: Basics

This guide will assist students who serve on the Pace law reviews. It provides a basic overview of cite checking, circulation policies, interlibrary loan request procedures, preemption checking, and finding a paper topic.

Purpose of Legal Citation

"The central function of a legal citation is to allow the reader to efficiently locate the cited source." The Bluebook: A Uniform System of Citation 1 (Columbia Law Review Ass'n et al. eds., 20th ed. 2015). Uniform style guides were developed over time to standardize citation. For law reviews, legal citation is prescribed by The Bluebook.

The Bluebook

Bluebook is the definitive style guide for legal citation. When working on a law review, you will be asked to consult The Bluebook for proper legal citation. Learn how to use The Bluebook and how to find the applicable rules.

Helpful Tips from Bloomberg, Lexis, and Westlaw

Basic Tips

Save yourself some time by working in teams. The same source could be cited many times within one article or even across several articles. Make sure you communicate with your fellow associates so that you are not all requesting the same exact source.

Start your work from a consolidated Table of Authorities. This makes it easier to see that an article cites to the same source more than once. Considering using a product like Lexis for Microsoft Office that creates a table of authorities and checks and corrects citation formats. 

Many materials are available for free on the Internet, but should not necessarily be cited to in a law review article. There is a need for permanent, authenticated, and authoritative sources. Print resources meet these criteria, which is why The Bluebook prefers their citation.

Read through rules 18.2.1 (General Internet Citation Principles) and 18.2.2 (Citations to Internet Sources). A recent rule in the Bluebook (18.2.1(d)) encourages the archiving of Internet sources using reliable archival tools like perma.cc.

To attempt to retrieve a broken link, use the Internet Archive.

Contact Information for the Library

This guide is currently maintained by Cynthia Pittson.